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Dr. Daniel Sumrok Brings Trauma-Informed Model to Primary Care at Integrative Health Center of McKenzie

Posted 3/17/20

A local physician has dedicated his career to revolutionizing the medical industry with a trauma-informed model and now looks to implement the methods he’s helped innovate at his McKenzie …

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Dr. Daniel Sumrok Brings Trauma-Informed Model to Primary Care at Integrative Health Center of McKenzie

Posted

A local physician has dedicated his career to revolutionizing the medical industry with a trauma-informed model and now looks to implement the methods he’s helped innovate at his McKenzie clinic.

Dr. Daniel Sumrok has practiced medicine in McKenzie since 1991, when he was recruited to McKenzie Medical Center by Dr. Volker Winkler. Prior to that, Sumrok was an Army doctor and worked for U.S. Public Health Services. At MMC, his portfolio included obstetrics, family medicine, addiction treatment and emergency care.

After a year at MMC, Sumrok purchased the private practice of the retiring Dr. Sidney Ray. He moved that practice to its current location at 1894 Cedar Avenue in 2005.

Dr. Sumrok also served as the emergency room director at Martin’s Volunteer Community Hospital from 2001 to 2011 and had an office in Dresden from 2007 to 2011.

After his stint in Martin, he shifted to addictions medicine full-time, while still offering some primary care.

His addiction patients have made over 23,000 visits to his McKenzie practice.

Going all the way back to 1991, Sumrok has been affiliated with the University of Tennessee’s Department of Family Medicine at the UT Health Sciences Center in Memphis. There, he offered clinical clerkship experiences to third- and fourth-year medical students. In the 90’s, he offered a women’s health fellowship in both McKenzie and Memphis, and it continues in Memphis today. He was a full-time UT employee from 2014-19. He helped begin the Center for Addiction Sciences, which is recognized as America’s first Center of Excellence in Addiction Science.

The McKenzie clinic, along with a clinic near Vanderbilt University in Nashville, make up Integrative Health Centers, an ambitious new medical initiative by Sumrok and his two partners, Ryan Chapman and Lee McCormick.

McCormick is the founder of several highly-successful residential treatment centers, including The Ranch in Nunnelly, Tennessee (near Centerville). Sumrok was medical director at the facility from 2011 to 2015.

Chapman is an entrepreneur who has achieved monumental success at a young age alongside his own experience with addiction and recovery. At the age of 18, he began working as a cashier at Premier Parking in Nashville and became the owner within four years. Two years ago, at age 34, he sold it as one of the largest parking providers in the nation.

In 2010, McCormick co-founded Integrative Life Center in Nashville, and Chapman became majority owner and CEO in 2018. Sumrok joined the ILC staff in August of last year.

Chapman is IHC’s CEO, and Sumrok is the company’s Chief Medical Officer.

In an interview with The Banner, Dr. Sumrok described his goals to distinguish his clinic from conventional practices: patient involvement in treatment plans, a safe environment that won’t retraumatize patients and creation of individualized treatment plans as opposed to a one-size-fits-all approach.

Under his trauma-informed model, all patients, whether they are addiction patients or primary care patients, receive treatment that factors in their trauma history. Individuals can be assigned a score based on adverse childhood experiences, or ACEs, which include things like abuse, neglect, addiction in the household, parental divorce or separation and bullying, among others.

Sumrok said that research shows many chronic diseases in American adults can be traced back to ACEs, including 80 percent of the top ten causes of death identified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

A study published recently by Sumrok and colleagues at UTHSC and at the University of Memphis, based on data from addiction patients at his clinic, shows how ACE scores can predict opioid relapse and how trauma-informed treatment can decrease relapses. The study has received national recognition and contributes to a paradigm shift in the medical industry toward trauma-informed care.

Practicing with Sumrok in McKenzie is Allison Castleman, FNP (Family Nurse Practitioner). She is a Greenfield native and a Martin resident. Castleman graduated from the University of Tennessee at Martin as a Registered Nurse in 2011 and from the University of Memphis as an FNP in December 2019. She joined the IHC staff in late February and described her role to The Banner as “providing total care for our patients.”

The clinic’s LPN is Jason Hodge, a lifelong South Fulton resident and Tennessee Tech graduate.

The office manager is Patsy Mattox, who has worked with Sumrok since he arrived in McKenzie.

Stephanie McClerkin is the patient care coordinator.

Integrative Health Center of McKenzie operates Monday through Thursday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and Friday from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Patients can be seen by appointment or walk-in.

IHC anticipates accepting all forms of insurance as well as the uninsured.

The clinic can be reached at 731-352-0603.

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