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Memorial Marker Placed for Soldier of American Revolution

William Steen Memorialized

Posted 10/6/20

WESTPORT (October 3) — A memorial celebration of life and a remembrance of one man’s service to his newly formed country was held at the Barr Springs Cemetery near Westport on …

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Memorial Marker Placed for Soldier of American Revolution

William Steen Memorialized

Posted

WESTPORT (October 3) — A memorial celebration of life and a remembrance of one man’s service to his newly formed country was held at the Barr Springs Cemetery near Westport on Saturday.

Members of the Sons of the American Revolution and Daughters of the American Revolution held the service on this crisp October afternoon.

William Steen was born in Ireland and left for the New World, what would become the United States, in 1770.

William was a farmer by occupation and served in the militia during the Revolutionary War. He married Agnes Nancy Lusk in 1774. They had 11 children, born over 30 years.

He fought in the Battle of Kings Mountain in North Carolina which occurred October 7, 1780. William was wounded and taken prisoner. He was rescued and his wife was sent word of his condition. That very day, his three-year-old daughter died. She left her deceased child and rode a horse overnight some 40 miles to where William was. She boiled water, added herbs, and put William’s red bandana in the water. She then ran the bandana through the musket-ball hole in William’s body. That was to kill the infection. He lived, but was never as strong as before.

Several years after hostilities ended with Great Britain, William and his family left South Carolina heading for Mississippi, where they were promised land.

They stopped in Carroll County, Tennessee to farm and restock for the last leg of their journey to Mississippi. While residing in Carroll County, William Steen died. He had went out early in the morning to search for his missing livestock. His mangled body was found. It was unsure whether the Native Americans or bears took his life. It is unsure where he was buried.

Shortly after his death, his family except for three children resumed their journey to Mississippi. William’s daughter Sarah married Thompson Enochs and both are buried at Barr Springs Cemetery. It is assumed William is buried near his daughter in Barr Springs Cemetery. William’s newly placed memorial marker was placed next to his daughter Sarah’s grave.

Descendants of William Steen in the South Carroll County area are many. It includes the descendants of Gabriel Enochs and Winey A. Roark; Richard J. Hill and Martha F Enochs; and Robert J Reed and Jane Enochs,

Some of the current descendants of William who reside in the Clarksburg area are James Darnall of Huntingdon, the Reed family of Clarksburg to include the descendants of Jim Reed, and the Lewis family of Yuma to include the descendants of the late Ned D Lewis, brother Mike Lewis, and the late Patricia Lewis Johnson of Huntingdon.

Dorothy Steen of Nashville provided a detailed history of the events of William Steen’s life. It took her over two years to accomplish. She is the widow of Rev. John Steen, who was a member of SARS. Members of the Sons of the American Revolution, dressed in period attire, fired three rounds from their muskets followed by the playing of TAPS to memorialize Steen.

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